Health officials are recommending to get a flu shot before the illness spreads throughout the community. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October. They say getting vaccinated later, however, can still be beneficial. Officials add that it takes two weeks after a vaccination for antibodies that protect against flu to develop in the body.

Seasonal flu activity often begins as early as October and November and can continue to occur as late as May. Flu activity most commonly peaks in the U.S. between December and February.

The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone six months of age and older as the first and most important step in protecting against the disease.

Tomah Memorial Hospital marketing and public relations director Eric Prise said flu vaccinations are offered every Tuesday from 1-5 p.m. and Fridays from 2-5 p.m. at the Tomah Memorial Warrens Clinic, located off Interstate 94 at Warrens. Prise said no appointments are necessary.

“Over the past few years, the first confirmed cases of flu at Tomah Memorial have occurred in January with the season peaking in February,” Prise added.

He said the best prevention against the flu is a flu shot.

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Tomah Journal editor

Steve Rundio is editor of the Tomah Journal. Contact him at 608-374-7785.

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