Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit

More Geriatric Phenotype for Black Patients Hospitalized With AMI

  • Updated
  • 0
More Geriatric Phenotype for Black Patients Hospitalized With AMI

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a younger age, Black participants hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have a more geriatric phenotype, with more functional impairments, according to a study published online Nov. 23 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Patrick C. Demkowicz, from the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues analyzed data from patients aged 75 years or older who were hospitalized for AMI at 94 U.S. hospitals from 2013 to 2016 to examine racial disparities in aging-specific functional impairments and mortality.

Of the 2,918 participants, 91.4 and 8.6 percent self-identified as White and Black, respectively. The researchers found that compared with White participants, Black participants were younger (80.8 versus 81.7 years) and more likely to be female (64.8 versus 42.5 percent). The likelihood of presenting with impairments in cognition, mobility, and vision was significantly increased among Blacks, and they were also more likely to report a disability in one or more activities of daily living and an unintentional loss of more than 10 lb in the year before hospitalization. Black participants had an unadjusted odds ratio of six-month mortality of 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 2.8), which was attenuated after adjustment for age and clinical characteristics (odds ratio, 1.7; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 2.5) and became nonsignificant after adjustment for functional/geriatric conditions (odds ratio, 1.5; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.0 to 2.2).

"Further attention is needed to develop and implement posthospital care programs that address the specific needs of older Black patients," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to Roivant Sciences; a second author disclosed receiving fees from CVS.

Abstract/Full Text

0 Comments
0
0
0
0
0

Originally published on consumer.healthday.com, part of the TownNews Content Exchange.

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

Residents of some parts of China's capital are overwhelming delivery apps as the city government orders faster construction of quarantine centers and field hospitals. Uncertainty and unconfirmed reports of lockdowns in at least some Beijing districts have fueled unusual demand for supplies. Buyers cleared shelves of food items in supermarkets in the northern suburbs, but it wasn't clear how widespread the phenomena was. Daily cases of COVID-19 are hitting records across the country, with 32,695 reported Friday. Of those, 1,860 were in Beijing, the majority of them asymptomatic. Improvised quarantine centers and field hospitals thrown up in large indoor spaces have become notorious for overcrowding, poor sanitation, scarce food supplies and lights that stay on 24 hours.

The Dallas Area Habitat for Humanity is using part of the $9 million gift it received from philanthropist MacKenzie Scott in March to provide its staff members a new employee benefit — $13,500 in the form of a forgivable loan to help with a down payment or closing costs on a home. Rebecca Thompson, who works in the nonprofit's fundraising office, thought she'd never be able to buy her own home. Now, Thompson hopes that with the down-payment assistance she can find a home with two bedrooms so she can have a home office. Plus, her cats and lizard could use some extra space.

Barely a month after granting himself a third five-year term as China's leader, Xi Jinping is facing a wave of public anger over his “zero COVID" policy. Demonstrators poured into the streets over the weekend in cities including Shanghai and Beijing, in protests unprecedented since the 1989 student-led pro-democracy movement centered on Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Most protesters focused their anger on restrictions that confine families to their homes for months and have been criticized as neither scientific or effective. But some also shouted for Xi and the Communist Party that has ruled China for 73 years to give up power.

Fentanyl has become a scourge across America and is taking a toll on the growing number of people living on the streets of Los Angeles. About a third of the 2,000 homeless deaths between April 2020 and March 2021 were from an overdose. The federal government says the highly addictive and lethal synthetic drug has quickly become the deadliest drug in the nation. While help is available, it is outpaced by the magnitude of misery on the streets. Homeless addicts in Los Angeles can be seen sprawled on sidewalks or passed out in alleys. Others peddle tiny doses and puffs of smoke to the desperate seeking their next high.

China's professional basketball league has fined former NBA star Jeremy Lin for making “inappropriate remarks” about quarantine facilities for his Chinese team. That comes as the government tries to suppress protests against anti-virus controls that are among the world's most stringent. More cities eased restrictions following protests last weekend in Shanghai and other areas in which some crowds called for President Xi Jinping to resign. The China Basketball Association says Lin was fined $1,400 for his remarks on social media about a hotel where his team stayed before a game. The news outlet The Paper said he complained about workout facilities. Phone calls to his team, the Loong Lions, weren't answered.

Indiana's Republican attorney general can continue his investigation of an Indianapolis doctor who spoke publicly about providing an abortion to a 10-year-old rape victim. The girl had traveled from Ohio after its more-restrictive abortion law took effect this summer. A judge on Friday rejected an attempt to block Attorney General Todd Rokita's investigation of Dr. Caitlin Bernard. Rokita alleges Bernard violated child abuse reporting and patient privacy laws. Bernard denies wrongdoing. The same judge also ruled Friday in a separate lawsuit that Indiana’s abortion ban adopted in August violates the state’s religious freedom law. The Indiana abortion ban was already on hold because of another legal challenge.

Listen now and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | RSS Feed | Omny Studio

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News