Skip to main contentSkip to main content

    European Union leaders are meeting in Prague to try to bridge significant differences over a natural gas price cap as winter approaches and Russia’s war on Ukraine fuels the energy crisis. It's hoped that a price cap will contain a crisis that is driving up prices for consumers and business. It could lead to rolling blackouts, shuttered factories and a deep recession over the winter. As the Europeans bolster their support for Ukraine in the form of weapons, money and aid, Russia has reduced or cut off natural gas to 13 member nations. Standing in the way of an agreement at Friday's summit is the simple fact that each member country depends on different energy sources and suppliers.

      As he turns 70, Russian President Vladimir Putin finds himself in the eye of a storm of his own making: His army is suffering humiliating defeats in Ukraine. Hundreds of thousands of Russians are fleeing his mobilization order, and his top lieutenants are publicly insulting military leaders. With his room for maneuvering narrowing, Putin has repeatedly signaled that he could resort to nuclear weapons to protect the Russian gains in Ukraine — a harrowing threat that shatters the claims of stability he has repeated throughout his 22-year rule. Andrei Kolesnikov is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment. He says Putin can't blame anyone but himself.

        The two major-party candidates seeking to succeed retiring North Carolina Republican Sen. Richard Burr are meeting for what is likely their only televised debate. Democrat Cheri Beasley and Republican Ted Budd scheduled a Friday night debate at a cable television studio in Raleigh. Budd is a three-term congressman from Davie County who received the endorsement of former President Donald Trump over a year ago. Beasley is a former chief justice of the state Supreme Court and would be the first Black senator for North Carolina if elected. The election outcome could decide which party takes a majority in the current 50-50 Senate.

          Christine Barrett and her family had to climb on top of their kitchen cabinets because of flooding that surged into their house during Hurricane Ian. They put water wings on their 1-year-old, and were rescued by boat the next day.  Their community of North Port is about 5 miles inland. And the Barretts _ like many neighbors _ live in areas where flood insurance isn’t required. And therefore they don’t have it. Now many wonder how they’ll afford much-needed repairs.  There are concerns that not enough people nationally have flood insurance at a time when climate change is believed to be making storms wetter. The Insurance Information Institute says only about 4% of homeowners nationwide have flood insurance although 90% of catastrophes in the U.S. involve flooding.

            In cities and suburbs across the U.S., Republicans up and down the ballot have overwhelmingly focused on sending a message that violent crime is out of control. They’re often pointing to criminal justice reforms adapted around the country in the wake of George Floyd’s killing by Minneapolis police, including changes to bail laws that critics had long contended disproportionately impacted communities of color, along with accusations that Democrats have not been sufficiently supportive of law enforcement. The message has appeared in some of the most competitive Senate races around the country in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Nevada, along with scores of races for U.S. House seats and governor’s mansions.

            A 49-year-old on a college football team, a visit to World Dairy Days, and stops at Mayo's Heritage Days, the Golden Rule ship and Hy-Vee make up 5 videos to watch now.

            Discover Wisconsin, the nation’s longest-running travel and tourism TV series, will spotlight Kwik Trip and why it has become one of the most beloved gas station brand in America.

            Volunteers for ‘Operation Eagles Wings’ are using surveys in eight states to seek support for conspiracy theories.

            Trump allies have interviewed nearly 200 election officials, including some in Wisconsin, to probe for weaknesses is a post from WisconsinWatch.org, a non-profit investigative news site covering Wisconsin since 2009. Please consider making a contribution to support our journalism.

            Diverted ambulances, cancer treatment delayed and electronic health records offline are just some of ripple effects of an apparent cyberattack on a major nonprofit health system that disrupted operations throughout the U.S. While CommonSpirit Health confirmed it experienced an ”“IT security issue” earlier this week, the company has remained mum when pressed for more details about the scope of the attack. Despite the lingering questions, the incident underscores the growing concerns surrounding ransomware attacks on health care systems with patient care at stake. Brett Callow, a threat analyst with cybersecurity provider Emsisoft, says the incident could be “the most significant attack on the health care sector to date.”

            Affiliate

            Content by Brand Ave. Studios. The annual Amazon Prime Day is coming July 12 and 13, and per usual will offer discounts on many of your favorite things.

            Volunteers for ‘Operation Eagles Wings’ are using surveys in eight states to seek support for conspiracy theories.

            Trump allies have interviewed nearly 200 election officials, including some in Wisconsin, to probe for weaknesses is a post from WisconsinWatch.org, a non-profit investigative news site covering Wisconsin since 2009. Please consider making a contribution to support our journalism.

            Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

            Topics

            News Alerts

            Breaking News