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Ask Mayo Clinic Health System

Ask Mayo Clinic Health System: COVID-19 and the vaccine

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Q: I’ve heard some theories circulating about the COVID-19 vaccine, including that it was developed to control the general population through microchip tracking or “nanotransducers” in our brains. I’ve also heard that it will alter my DNA. Are these theories true?


A: No, those assertions are false.

There is no vaccine microchip, and the vaccine will not track people or gather personal information into a database. This myth started after comments made by Bill Gates from The Gates Foundation about a digital certificate of vaccine records.

The technology he was referencing is not a microchip, has not been implemented in any manner and is not tied to the development, testing or distribution of COVID-19 vaccines.

As for the altered DNA theory, the first COVID-19 vaccines to reach the market were messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines. According to the CDC, mRNA vaccines work by instructing cells in the body how to make a protein that triggers an immune response.

Injecting mRNA into your body will not interact or do anything to the DNA of your cells. Human cells break down and get rid of the mRNA soon after they have finished using the instructions.

Answered by Dr. Kevin Fitzgerald. Dr. Fitzgerald is family medicine physician at Mayo Clinic Health System in Onalaska and chair of the Division of Family Medicine at Mayo Clinic Health System Southwest Wisconsin region. Questions can be sent to letters@lacrossetribune.com.

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